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hill. why do we not see that any more? is it two sides or environment is so hardened? >> i think so. i also think that personality of these two men would not be best described as anti-social they to. but we're seeing this weird culture of bipartisan, you know we were supposed to put it away after the elect, and think about what is best of the country. i think they are staaing separate, they should be eating athe same table now. neil: they are not doing that. there is so much you could dodo with a serogate, and say surprise it seems to me, dr., doctor when ronald reagan heard things come up out of capitol hill, or tip o'neill he brought him over to the white house, said how can we compromise on this his famous line, i would rather get 80% of a loaf or no loaf at all, we don't see it, it is either my way or the highway, and i blame motorcycl both side. >> i do too, you said t word, compromise that is what works in great marriaging and even politics. meet in the middle. neil: why not have it at the white house? i think that white house, if you do something in private residences a big deal
on the overall security environment on the peninsula as well as in asia. >> did you follow up anything new? we been hearing rumblings for a time. anything new you can provide in terms of insight into lunches are things like that? >> i think you're tracking it pretty well for the media today there are indications of what they will call a satellite launch. we believe it is still the u.n. security resolutions because of the missile they'll be fired and the implications it has for ballistic missiles activity somewhere down the road and the destabilizing impact it will have on the security environment throughout the region, not just dependent. >> can you follow up on some of that? what is your assessment? they say they saw birth of her problems at their failed launch. what is your assessment? how could they have felt the problems? juicier ran possibly helping them? and do you think he's doing this in response to hard-liners in his own government? why would he be doing this? >> well, the professed reason is to probably do it in conjunction with the anniversary on the 17th, which is widely reported i
and in the environment grow more numerous and more fearsome. in response, progressives of all stripes coalesce, find their voice and their strength and pioneer the development of a powerful set of new ideas and policy proposals confirming that the path to a better world does, indeed, exist. demonstrations and protests multiply, and a popular movement for pro-democracy reform and transformative change is born. at the local level, people in groups plant the seeds of change through a host of innovative initiatives that provide inspirational models of how things might work in a new political economy devoted to sustaining human and natural communities. and sensing the direction in which things are moving, our wiser and more responsible leaders rise to the occasion, support the growing movement for change and frame a compelling story or narrative that makes sense of it all and provides a positive vision of a better america. the movement broadens to become a major national force. we don't know exactly how these or other forces will emerge or interact, but we do know this: that pleas for immediate action, f
what they are doing here and implications in the overall security environment on the korean peninsula, as well as destination. >> anything new? we been hearing some rumblings for some time that there might be some activity on that front. anything new that you can provide in terms of insights into launches or things like that? >> well, i think you're tracking a pretty well. i think from the media today there are indications declared indications of their intention to do what they would call a peaceful satellite launch. and we believe it is in contradictory to the u.n. security council resolutions, that because of the nature of the type of missile they will be firing and the implications it has for ballistic missile type of activity somewhere down the road, and the destabilizing impact that will have on security incitement throughout the throughout the region, not just on the peninsula. >> can you follow up on some of -- was short assessment? they say they have solve whatever problems they had with her april failed launch. what's your assessment? how could they have solve the problem? wh
. who have good home environments, right? who don't run a crazy ship at home. the kids with a crazy environment, homework hurts then. we have to make it equitable and fair for them to have the same environment to work on the crazy, familiarial problem. >> greg: what is french homework? riding a bicycle with a basket and bah quet? >> andrea: drinking red wine and smoking cigarettes. you got a-plus. >> bob: they go home and get loaded with wine. >> greg: i'm half french. bost you are? >> greg: yes. >> andrea: oh hl la. >> dana: que paso. >> greg: what does that mean? >> dana: what's up in spanish. >> greg: what does vit to do with this? you know who words from a language. >> dana: no. i know more than that. i do. i swear. feliz navidad. that is coming up, how much do they know about fe will beiz navdad? andrea hit the streets to find out. >> can you name tall santa reindeer? >> prancer. >> ♪ on this 12th day of christmas my true love gave to me 12 --" >> geese allaying. >> dana: christmas trivia directly ahead. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] you like who you are... and you learned somet
smiling, playing, and learning together in a safe environment. but here is the surprise. this isn't america, it's tijuana, mexico. a tough place for a child due to drugs, violence and poverty. but the first club is helping to change lives. and this is the first boys and girls club in south africa, lives are changed here and in mexico, because the children are learning that great futures start here. the expansion of the dream is due to the vision of tupperware brand's ceo, rick and his wife susan. for more than 20 years, he's been encouraging the company to make a difference through global and social responsibility. >> i think there's really a change in the role of what-- in the social contract between individuals and their governments. a lot of governments are going broke, there's a time here where corporations need to step up and find a way, not just to fund, but to put their focus, when you put funds and focus behind it, then things start to happen. >> tupperware is proof that some big businesses are big on helping others, since 1992, tupperware has been one of the leading corpo
allocation. how do you generate returns and manage volatility in this kind of environment where there's so much you can't control? global head of institutional clients with jpmorgan asset management, welcome. i'm going to ask something that may be counter intuitive to a lot of people. maybe not to you. it seems to me your clients, institutions, pensions, endowments, are tax exempt. they don't have to worry quite as much it would seem to me about avoiding dividend taxes or capital gains taxes as ordinary individuals. am i right about that or wrong? >> yes and no. the point being if the fiscal cliff you look at china, eurozone, it is all coming together to create an environment of total uncertainty for a lot of the biggest investors in the world. pension funds in the u.s. are trying to manage the volatility of the funding levels, generating return. think of where the average u.s. pension fund is trying to again rate a return from 6.5% to 8%. >> it's not so much that they're concerned about a looming tax hike that might affect their portfolios as it is about the uncertainty that the cliff rep
environment, a huge life skill competitive sports in particular, extraordinary gain of american football. >> would you want for christmas? >> record by the dolphins but maybe we are off. we will see. i know i should aim higher. >> happy birthday. we are honored, we appreciate you being here. thank you for watching us. we are thankful for the partnership, thank you for coming out so early. thank you for a fantastic conversation. [applause] >> thank you for having me. >> the supreme court will look at what happened in 2008 by a majority of 6-3 and they are going to say that is a precedent and indiana had -- >> talking about facts, they decided on the indiana case it was constitutional for them to establish i d. they did not say that all of those states would subsequently -- [talking over each other] >> let me finish because you misrepresented what i said. [talking over each other] >> the supreme court is the law of the land. >> when i hear these accusations that black people, voter i.d. laws disproportionately affect minorities because it -- somehow we have something missing in our brain.
on both environment and genetics. we have established large networks to collect data and conduct powerful analyses. those networks explore possible causative factors in the environment before, during and after pregnancy. one of these networks published a study that suggests prenatal and early life exposure to car emissions is a factor. in 2012, congress appropriated over $47 million for autism and other developmental disorders. this supports 43 training programs through 41 states and projects for underserved populations. federal agencies also use public-private partnerships to maximize our, such as the nih national data office of research that has an autism depository. this brings together hundreds of researchers and clinicians with tens of thousands of people nationwide affected by asd. there is a call center, web based -- the nih supported the association in the early prevention of autism. in conclusion, since the establishment, wide expertise has come to bear on autism with research rapidly translating into individuals and the community. coordinated efforts to identify best practices t
is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
us about. host: thank you for the call. speaking along the lines of the environment and the epa. there is this -- from "to the boston globe" -- this from "the l.a. times" -- from "the gazette" in colorado -- our question for you is, what the think the president's no. 1 priority should be? just is joining us on the democrat line. caller: good morning. it was a little bit of serendipity that you read the editorial from "the new york times." i believe the first priority, our entire government should be repairing the infrastructure of the country. we have some infrastructure from the 19th century. with what just happened in new york, i really do think that our treasure and our people -- repairing the infrastructure will create jobs. we also have to begin protecting our coastal communities from the mega storms. even if we just decided right now to work against climate change or to slow down climate change, it still is going to happen. it will happen. it is a mechanism that is not going to stop even if we were to stop pumping co2 into the atmosphere. we have to prepare and work to tha
, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the am more at thisization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis this country has faced since the de
environment. >> brenda: larry. >> brenda, the younes need to reinvent themselves. if they need to get into my skilled jobs and earn higher wages and that's the key. >> you're right and the idea of organizing the lowest end of the structure here is, as jonas says, the average lifetime of employee i think is nine mons in the fast food busins so it's antithetical and-- >> these an't coal mines and slaughter houses, brenda, these are folding sweaters at the gap, cashiers. >> we need to see more unions in china where they could make a difference, they could lift wages and improve living standards there. >> absolutely. >> and keep chinese, work forces from taking jobs away from america. >> good luck with that. >> brenda: thank you for the debate. and sandy victims facing devastation one month later, so is this any time for the united nations to be using them as a fund raising tool? the cavuto gang is all over that one at the bottom of the hour. up here first, forget fees in >> forget the pain, if we fall into the financial ditch. a new regulation in the the health care law might mauck you down rig
environment, once google has seen that new rocketship, i see no reason why google should be any different. especially since google owns android. they need to figure out how to monetize it better. something the company is doing by releasing its own line of smartphones and tablets. google is sold out until after christmas. of the growth stocks, i got to admit i like google less than i did before the bad quarter if you're trying to figure out which of these stocks worries me the most, it's google, it's become a show-me situation. how about visa and master cad? both up decently since i recommended them in october. these are both plays in the worldwide switch from paper currency to plastic. visa and mastercard both reported strong quarters in october, they have healthy balance sheets. mastercard is winning new business all over the place. and visa announced a $1 billion buyback. even though visa has a new ceo, i'm a big fan of both stocks. i think they're both candidates to offer special dividends as the year unwinds. they've got the cash for certain. then there's the sherwin williams. the sto
, that's a target-rich environment is what we refer to california. they raise taxes again. they sent the message that the unions are going to continue to control the process out there. they defeated proposition 32. they passed proposition 30 which was the increase in their taxes. so, california businessmen and women are looking at their bottom line saying, where are we going to go? other places? >> governor, is it too much of a leap to say when we do this at the federal level they leave the country, bilss can eventually leave the country. >> sure. >> but we can't seem to make the leap to say that. and i'm talking about the fiscal cliff now. i wonder if you were at 25% of gdp, if the government had grown to this size where it is right now and you were trying to figure out how to deal with it and you were in charge, would it be all about -- would the first thing you come up with be raising taxes? would not -- wouldn't you address the spending -- wouldn't you address the spending side of -- >> right. >> -- and, you know, the republicans are trying to criticize the obama proposals by say
what the environment means in haiti. >> the environment means a lot. haiti is a country that has been hit by seasonal climate events almost every year. weather events and hurricanes have severely affected the country. every year, thousands of people are dying. many have been displaced. many others are still homeless. as a youth, it is my responsibility to take part in these activities, to do something about it. i would like to see climate justice. >> what the climate justice mean to you? >> for me, eradication of poverty. that means developed countries need to take responsibility by fulfilling -- by providing finance, which is key for countries like haiti. >> marco, what the climate justice mean to you? >> all of that, including the fact that currently, emissions in the atmosphere, 75% are coming from developed countries , countries that have done everything for over a century and now they're trying to place the burden on developed countries -- developing countries who barely have enough to eat. we have a severe injustice here that we need to act on. climate justice, in a nutshell, me
to implement. i will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is substantially larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal and therefore this will be a more valuable change. second because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far larger. frankly, not many loans in the past have hit that limit. so even though it's $1 trillion portfolio, the value of that change is quite small for the old loans. it's really going to be quite valuable for these newer very low interest rate loans. >> i'll be briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that's a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. i don't understand. why are you doing that? >> this is another area where we are working on changes. here's the issue. we have a significant number of homeowners that were responsible homeowners, had good credit scores that lost their jobs in the biggest economic crisis th
then baked circe wells while also enhancing the environment. although the project on our coast of their job, they were weakened or in the storm not require repairs so were not for mobility future storms. unfortunately the northeast mid-atlantic received more frequent and larger storms like standing in the future. the 70 to find cost-effective ways to ensure projects will continue to protect lives and property. we also need to look into whether adaptive measures. wetlands, oyster beds and sea grass that are cost and can be sustained for years to come. but can also get better results for less money if we allow states more flexibility in managing different sources along the shoreline is a complete set of the system instead as an individual project. this strategy is called regional government man to rent this one that deserves more attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new b
will say, however, that the value of doing it now in a low interest rate environment is larger on these new loans for two reasons. the lower the interest rate, the faster the amortization of the principal. therefore, this will be a more valuable change. second, because these loans are so low interest rate, they will be on our books far longer. not many loans in the past have hit that limit. even though it is $1 trillion, the value of the change is small for the old loans. it is going to be valuable for these newer, very low interest rate loans. >> briefly two more questions. i see that f.h.a. is now making loans to people who three years ago were foreclosed upon. and that is a very different standard than even exists at fannie and freddie. why are you doing that? put this is another area where we are working on changes. responsible hone owners got good credit scores that lost their jobs. we believe somebody can show that they are back to work and a responsible borer again. that is someone we would work with. i would agree that our standards are not clear enough in dividing those. so what we
and be informed in an entertaining, fun environment, in a safe environment, where they can take that, what they have learned from the show and have conversations. >> it is also a tough environment. i e-mailed you before i went to see it. i said, i have a daughter that's almost 11. do you think you should bring her? >> i thought, i'm not sure. when i thought it, i saw exactly, i'm not sure. some of what happens to girls in the world is pretty ugly. >> i think girls 12 and over should see the play. i was just doing the 1 billion rising tour that we will talk about. i was in mexico city. i was with one of the women there that is fighting sex trafficking and human trafficking which $6 billion a year industry. we were just walking down the streets. there were girls, 9, 10, 11, 12, who had been sold, who had been kidnapped, raped 60 times a day. the kind of lives of women, girls across the planet is so varied. it is all part of the same story, girls not having agency over their bodies. >> on the one hand, you have monologues, often global girls telling about horrific conditions like that sexual
look at jobs report tomorrow, is dismal. we're liking inflationary environment down the road. this is bad news. >> you could could make the argument invite blowing past short term helpful, long term payne full. melissa: spending cuts, tax hikes are very dramatic going over the cliff. when you look at numbers, still is like five to one raising taxes to cutting spending. >> that's right. melissa: no one is really talking about cutting spending. isn't that the first thing you would do? if your fiscal house was in such disarray, household at home, first thing you do is stop spending. no one is doing that. >> what scares me, is that point. whether you agree or disagree hiking taxes i am not a fan of it but i think it will come. we can get past this. charlie gasparino and i have argued this. one of the consequences of the election the president will probably get his way raising most rates. melissa: right. >> i'm not saying i'm a fan. let's get past that, let's make it happen. republicans realize you lost election you didn't suddenly lose your backbone. this should be precursor gett
on the table could you imagine that breaking through the current political environment. >> i think basically now, gwen, there are three sticking points. one is the amount of revenue and the sources of revenue. the second is the amount of spending cuts and how much of that will come from the entitlement programs particularly health. the last sticking point is what do we do about this debt limit that we've come up against all the time that puts our credit in danger. >> ifill: the president has said the debt limit should be, at least in his opening statement, that the debt limit debate should be set aside and that nothing can be done unless the taxes are cut... are raised for the wealthy. is that part of a solution that you can see working for what it is everybody is trying to get to here? >> look, gwen, i'm not a bit worried that it appears on the surface that secretary geithner ton the speaker didn't make any progress last week. that's just a theater you go through. geithner made his first offer. the republicans rejected it. no surprise. i'm sure that this offer that the speaker has made toda
people are. we're in a greatly diminished yield environment. people scramble for what they can. if you think yields are low know, a lot of investors think they could even go lower. it's unbelievable how low the yields are in the fixed income markets, but again, i think you're going to see compression with those types of stocks. i think what you're really going to see is dividend policies revisited contrary to the fact that from a tax point of view, folks are going to be basically less likely to buy dividend stocks because investors want income, and that's the only place they can get it. >> michael, we get a handf fufu companies every day declaring dividends. they're accelerating the payment to try to beat out the fiscal cliff. would you invest looking for companies like that right now? >> i think you're seeing the top of the dividend trade. i think if anything, what's going to end up happening is a focus back into cyclical sectors for 2013. you want the global trade. you don't want the domestic trade anymore. >> you're not going to be jumping on the bandwagon here just because companie
's hard to earn an extra buck in that environment. you're seeing citi, in fact, address those concerns in the layoff announcement today. >> ifill: what does that tell bus the health of the banking sector and whether other big banking institution might be following suit? >> citigroup is not as mump an indicator species as i think people would want it to be. 15 years ago, it was the financial supermarket. it rolled everything together. it's one-stop shopping, and that mold has been called into question, not least by the architect of this model, sandy wiel, saying we should break up the big banks. gwen, i think it tells us more about the end of the era of kind of this force conglomeration of bank where's bigger is naturally better. you have seen, obviously, too big to fail banks become too bigger to fail, such as j.p.morgan, or wells fargo which bought wachovia. but there are others who find they can't hit their stride with the asset they say accummed a decade ago. >> ifill: what we're watching happening at citigroup. does that make them an outlier or a sign of things to come? >> i think
because we're stuck in a real tough environment right now with that darn fiscal cliff deadline looming, three weeks away, our political leaders getting absolutely nowhere -- >> buy buy buy! >> sell sell sell! >> it doesn't mean we stop searching for opportunities to make money. even in the most dismal markets there are always stocks that have the ability to go higher. just got to find them. takes a lot of work. one i've been doing a lot of work on, it's called dst systems. dog sam tom. now, dst is not a great business. hmm. but i think it could be a terrific stock. the reason? i see number signs suggesting that dst could be preparing itself for a sale. and if not, it sure as heck should be. but even if dst doesn't get bought out, it has a fabulous story. it's a tale that we've repeated over and over again. it's one that's made big money in a number of stocks for us. see, dst, which is just a terrible name for a company, but that's what they call themselves, is a company where the whole is currently worth a lot less than the parts. now, in recent months dst has started to get aggressive
] in some of those difficult -- and one of the most difficult environments. lieutenant colonel vowell ripeness at stanford university doing his work college fellowship. [inaudible] >> cooperation spent all right. center for international security and cooperation. want to get your stanford bosses to let you come out here today. very, very happy. he's working on a thesis right now on afghanistan after 2014. but, of course, i got to know him while he was deployed in afghanistan, and got to visit his battalion. first, while he was out where we met, joe holiday at the time the no slack, and now the study of war, then again in february of 2011 at a commanders conference held by the colonel who was the commander of task force, second brigade -- first brigade. first brigade of the 101st responsible for all of kunar province. i'm never going to live that down. but we are absolutely thrilled to have you here to talk to us about not only a different echelon. so if you can all welcome for me lieutenant colonel j. b. vowell who will soon take command of task force, well, of the third brigade of th
. there are plenty of real worries out there. especially the fiscal cliff. in this grim environment you can find sectors that are holding up better than you might think. poncy says the pull back in retail might be just the moment that you want to pull the trigger to this key sector index. wouldn't that be something? stay with cramer and we will be right back. >> coming up. something is brewing. starbucks has been serving up solid returns. but could concerns about its moving to tea mean it is time to layoff the caffeine or is this your chance to fill up your cup before the shares really get percolating? cramer is grinding through the facts next. >>> tomorrow we are going to hear from one of my favorite companies and it is starbucks. having its biennial analyst day. right now it is more than ten points off its high for the year. i think it could mark the beginning of the stock's next big rally. you can follow along at a service that i do with the street. tomorrow i expect a terrific story. i'll give you a preview. lots of people ask me how i would approach this meeting. if i
the creation of jobs in the u.s. economy. if you can get the u.s. economy past this model through environment, you will see a slight acceleration in the second half. cheryl: your last point is manufacturing. in the report, it was basically flat. we had downward revision for september and october from the report. you are not concerned about that sector at all? >> i am not concerned about that sector. we are looking at a longer-term and the impact it has on the u.s. economy. when you look at what the u.s. does in a manufacturing basis, we manufacture 18.2% of other manufactured goods in the world today. that is bigger than japan. that is bigger than china. it is a very significant number. we do it better and less expensively. cheryl: a report saying it would be a good thing for this country if we begin to export natural gas. it would be good for the u.s. economy. some, especially in washington, saying it would be a bad thing. it would be a job killer. >> it is hard to me to figure that out. i think we have to find a balance between exports and the cheap fuel in the united states which will caus
environment. we think of that? >> it is absolutely true. it is the possibility of capital gains and the stream o dividends. it is the same as diverting water away from the river. the river won't have the same amount of flow and that will affect the value of the wer come into the river and of the stock market. eventually in time, that will be repriced and recess -- but for now, it is a big deal against the stock market. neil: all the companies that have been hiking up their dividends. whaa is enough for them to do it now? >> well, what's in it for them is that the stockholders get a dividend of four the taxes are increased upon him. and that is a big plus for them. by the way, they c accomplish very much the same thing through stock buybacks. neil: we are probably not eing that now. >> big smiles, i see people all the time. people don't look happy. neil: even when we h a boom in the economy, i would b in a mall and i would not be happy. >> that we are talking about the other people. [laughter] neil: you can catch him on fox news. >> thank you. neil, you are always a start. neil: it's you, buddy
an environment in which we can care for the elderly. >> the think americans will remain optimistic but this did of the economy? if we have not tackle the things we have just talked about like the cost of education, the housing market? we are figuring out some philosophical issues about taxing and funding? >> i think the economy has been growing slowly and steadily all in the absence of any movement, which we have seen over the test of the last year. i have worked on guantanamo for the past 10 years. my sense is that if there is some movement until the positive direction, which have not seen out of washington and enter a long time, -- in a long time, at least we will not see head winds. we are making some progress. i see that continue. >> i want to come back to what todd said earlier. i am concerned about confidence being fragile. todd reference what happened until august of 2011. we saw in limited to lie confidence tank. market confidence grew jog with some of the market confidence plunged. i think we have to be concerned -- market confidence plunged. if we look like we are not grappling with t
remember to put money to work. in an environment where not people put money to work and people aren't doing anything, you get an influx of retail money. you have to commit that money to your retirement and to your kids. >> interesting. >> it's a big difference. >> btig has a note on seasonality regarding the end of the year and even december '08 was positive. how resilient the month of december is. >> funny you mention that. that was such a false tell. we thought maybe things had bottomed and then just off a cliff, not fiscal but stock right after that. it's a great note. >> meantime, as we await the opening bell this morning, we'll look at the s&p 500 at the realtime exchange on the top of your screen. big board here. >> there's the bell over at the nasdaq today, sears holdings and st. jude's children's research hospital celebrating the st. jude thanks and giving campaign. lead story involves delta and talks they say to acquire from singapore some stakes in virgin atlanta. >> we'll see what happens. they have been active. the one people are more focused on is american airlines in bankruptc
. they are building and acquiring land in this low interest rate environment which bodes well for this upswing in momentum. the question as you mentioned at what point do comparisons get so tough. first quarter 2012 was first quarter where they started to see the upswing. 45% increase in signed contracts. we're lapping that now. can we beat increases as we move on? >> it could be tough. to the extent that we're building, any momentum at the bottom here, we're still building off a small base as you know. so you could have significant growth for some time. >> everything that goes into a house. a lot of spending goes into a house. >> definitely. cramer has stocks on his list that are worthy of your attention. what does he think about them? his mad dash is coming up next. later, shares of gamestop surging from summer lows hoping to score big this holiday season. we'll talk with the ceo. let's take another look at futures as we head into this tuesday morning session. we're looking about flat. more "squawk on the street" straight ahead. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between u
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in a slow growth environment, but they've kept interest rates very low in japan, but the problem is, government is too big. that's why japan has not been able to start growing again. and this is the path that the u.s. is certainly on if we don't change that dynamic. >> paul: kim, is there any recognition about this in washington or is it all -- i mean, do you hear any of this discussion or do they really believe, certainly, the white house and the treasury, that tax rates like this don't matter, at that ultimately-- >> no, they do to a degree. if you talk to the officials iran up, come on, so we're going to raise the rates, what is fascinating to put it in the bigger context of the debate about tax revenue, the economists have the static view, you've got x-amounts of capital gains income and you get 20% more tax revenue. >> you don't, because people decide to shelter it. they do their transactions the year before, when the amount is less. and so, all of these numbers that the white house is counting on and sort of rubbing its hands together hoping to get. they're not going to get an
. >> cnn is an incredibly attractive ad environment. it's not just ratings. >> i can't stress this. this is the tricky thing for whoever runs cnn. this is cnn, this nation's last television journalism. you can make money pi cutting this channel down to msnbc and fox are. sure they have ratings in primetime but they don't do anything but spend their money. >> i read somewhere he said he's such a newsie he'll be like a kid in a candy store. he is the candy store. he's the candy store to what you just said. >> he's got something else. you said he's going to have a blank check. this is where all these mergers that cnn has experienced really pays off. time warner has a lot of money. cnn had a profit of $6400 million world wide. >> when you say the more id idealogical approach, sometimes the news isn't that stimulating. it is a programming challenge. >> that's why it's about more than politics and war. our 401(k) system is failing in this country. you may not be able to retire. i care about that. your kids school is crumbling. i care about that. we're reinventing our cities. you can make
and safety to the environment to taxation. in alec task forces, elected state officials and corporate representatives close the doors to press and public, and together approve the bills that will be sent out to america. but americans have no idea they come from alec, unless someone like a mark pocan exposes it. >> when i went down to new orleans, to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. and there was a proposal to provide special-needs scholarships. and lo and behold all of a sudden i come back to wisconsin, and what gets introduced? get ready. i know you're going to have a shocked look on your face. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in the wisconsin legislature sponsored that special-needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. pocan knew because the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. but pocan isn't only concerned that alec sneaks bills into the state legislature. the intent behind the bills troubles him too. >> some of their legislation sound
to meet. they don't meet. so, are you worried that environment makes things so dicey that no deal is done and if it is done, it it is a bad d. >>guest: i am worried. the so-called fiscal cliff was put in law because it was stuff that would be so unacceptable congress would never let it happen, enormous tax increases, grotesque cuts in spending but here we, it is in the law. congress does nothing which congress is good at doing and go over the cliff and some want to see that happen because then the crisis will generate the kind of bipartisan agreement we need but that is irresponsible. >>neil: it is looking more likely. then who picks up the pieces? >>guest: the country suffers. i don't think anyone gains politically. you know that almost everyone here in both parties will tell you if you talk to them privately, this ends with entitlement reform. not cutting programs like medicare but slowing down the growth in the programs because they are the big drivers of the deficit and raising more out of the revenue, out of the tax system. whether you call iterates or reform over whatever you call i
. >> that was the process in 1986. can that happen this day? >> it feels like a different environment. i do not know, but right now we are in the middle of a political test of wills on marginal tax rates. it is interesting we're not fighting on the underlying principle, which is that wealthy ought to pay more in order to help us close debts and deficits, get our economy back on track. right now the president thinks he won a point, was vindicated by his victory in the election, and republicans did not want to do that, but he has the hand in this struggle. restoring the clinton tax rates is something i would support. we supported them back in 1991 when bill clinton was running for president. no problem on that. it is a reasonable adjustment, but may not be sufficient to reach the targets we need and it does not help us in bipartisan bargaining, reaching a deal. i hope as this negotiation -- we ought to be at the irish times -- that they will not make a fetish of marginal tax rates street if they should go up some, but do they need to go back where they work? i do not know. lots of ways to increase tax
exceptionally clear, natural sound in quiet and noisy environments because of how it works with your ear's own anatomy. can your hearing aid do all this? lyric can. to learn more about lyric's advanced technology, call 1-800-511-3035 or visit for a risk-free 30 day trial offer and free dvd and brochure. get the hearing aid that can. lyric from phonak. lyric can. >>> police in arizona are desperately searching for this 11-year-old leukemia patient. she disappeared six days ago, just one day shy of being released from the hospital. but here's the thing. doctors fear this catheter in this girl's heart could possibly lead to an infection, could endanger her life. girl, she's identified only as emily, and you see her here walking on the right side of that, with her mother on the left. this is surveillance video, leaving phoenix children's hospital. the woman allegedly removed the girl's iv, changed her clothes, and walked her out the door. as for why, no one seems to know. the 11-year-old already had to have her right arm amputated because of an infection and is in desperate need of me
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